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Cambodia hotels and travel -visas, customs, and food

General & Introduction Infomation ••
Cambodia customs and visas information

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Visas, Customs, Food

Passport and Visas
Cambodia has very liberal visa regulations. For USD 20 $ all travelers can obtain a tourist visa valid for 30 days upon arrival at Phnom Penh and Siem Reap airports. A passport valid for at least six months beyond the end of your visit and one passport photo is needed. Visitors arriving overland from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam at the Bavet border crossing, or from Thailand at Trat (Hat Lay border crossing) or Aranyaprathet ( Poipet border crossing), must obtain a visa which clearly indicates then entry point prior to reaching the Cambodian border.

Customs and Formalities
Regulations are relaxed and simple formalities should be observed when entering the territory. Every traveler has to complete immigration and customs declaration forms during the arrival flight and must submit them on arrival. Any amount of foreign currency can be brought into Cambodia, but the amount of Cambodian currency must not exceed 100,000 Riels per person. Tourist and non-resident carrying over USD 10,000 in cash or its equivalent must declare it to ensure they will be allowed to take out with them the amount declared. Immigration formalities are quicker when travelers already possess their visa.

A Mittapheap Travel & Tours representative will meet travelers at the airport, after immigration control has been passed. For easy recognition, our representative will display a Mittapheap Travel & Tours sign with the names of the guests or their group. Leaving the country, luggage will be X-rayed in Phnom Penh airport and inspected in Siem Reap.

Food
Khmer cuisine is closely related to those in neighboring Thailand and Laos, although it is not as spicy. Curries, stir tried vegetable, rice, noodles and soups are staples of the Khmer diet. Cambodia is well known in the region for its Prahok, a strong, fermented fish paste used in a variety of traditional dishes. Fresh serve bottled drinking water and tap water should never be drunk. Similarly, salad and fruit served at these establishments are safe. All Tours are based on full board arrangements. For full-day excursions, picnic lunch can be provided if no adequate restaurants are available.

Cambodia food is closely related to the cuisines of neighboring Thailand and Laos and, to a lesser extent, Vietnam, but there are some distinct local dishes. The overall consensus is that Khmer cooking is like Thai without spicy. Curries, stir tried vegetable, rice, noodles and soups are staples of the Khmer diet.

Cambodia is well known in the region for its Prahok, a strong, fermented fish paste used in a variety of traditional dishes. Fresh serve bottled drinking water and tap water should never be drunk. Similarly, salad and fruit served at these establishments are safe. All Tours are based on full board arrangements. For full-day excursions, picnic lunch can be provided if no adequate restaurants are available.

Phnom Penh is far and away the best place to try inexpensive Khmer cuisine, though Siem Reap also has some good restaurants. One of the easiest and most affordable ways to acquaint yourself with Khmer cooking is to wander into the food stalls found in markets all over the country and simply sample each dish before deciding what to eat. In Phnom Penh you also have the choice of excellent Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, French and Mediterranean cooking.

Rice is the principal staple in Cambodia and the Battambang region is the country's rice bowl. Most Cambodian dishes are cooked in a wok, known locally as a chhnang khteak.

Nonalcoholic Drinks
All the famous international brands of soft drinks are available in Cambodia. Locally produced mineral water is available at 500r to 700r per bottle.Coffee is sold in most restaurants. It is either served black or with generous dollops of condensed milk, which makes it very sweet. Chinese-style tea is popular and in many Khmer and Chinese restaurants a pot of it will automatically appear as soon as you sit down.You can find excellent fruit smoothies all over the country, known locally as a tikalok. Just look out for a stall with fruit and a blender and point to the flavors you want. Keep an eye on the preparatory stages or you may end up with heaps of sugar and a frothy eggg.
On a hot day you may be tempted by the stuff in Fanta bottles on the side of the road. Think again, as it is actually petrol (gas).

Alcoholic Drinks
The local bee is Angkor, which is produced by an Australian joint venture in Sihanoukwille. Other brands include Heineken, Tiger, San Miguel, Carlsberg, VB, Foster's and Grolsch. Beer sells for around US$1 to US$1.50 a can in restaurants.In Phnom Penh, foreign wines and spirits are sold at reasonable prices. The local spirits are best avoided, though some expats say that Sra Special, a local whisky-like concoction, is not bad. At around 1000r a bottle it's a cheap route to oblivion.

Airport Tax
USD 20 $ per outgoing international passenger for flights from Phnom Penh
USD 8 $ per outgoing international passenger for flights from Siem Reap
USD 10 $ per outgoing domestic passenger for flights from Phnom Penh
USD 4 $ per outgoing domestic passenger for flights from all other domestic airports

 
     

 

 

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